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The History of Darjeeling Tea - Part 2

The History of Darjeeling Tea - Part 2

The Tea Campaign Australia was founded in 2015 by tea enthusiasts who wanted to bring the finest organic Darjeeling tea to Australians who love it as much as we do.

To continue indulging in our love of this product, here is the second part of our short history of Darjeeling Tea. If you haven’t read part one yet, take a look at it here!

Darjeeling is transformed

Though the British had colonised parts of India in the mid-1700s, they only entered the territory of Darjeeling in the 1820s. By putting themselves in between the political groups that wanted to claim the region for themselves, Britain eventually took possession of Darjeeling in 1835.

Soon afterwards, in 1841, a British civil surgeon who was transferred from Nepal to Darjeeling, Arthur Campbell started experimenting with tea nurseries in the Himalayan foothills. Soon afterwards the British government created their own tea nurseries to reap the same benefits of geography and workforce. 

As a result of the ideal climate and the desire to have a uniquely British tea supply, Darjeeling tea production quickly sky-rocketed.

Although the commerce of Darjeeling tea started in the 1850s, by the 1870s there were almost 40 tea plantations of a thousand acres, producing over 133,000 pounds of tea a year. 

In the next 10 years, this landmass shot up by 80% and production increased tenfold. Darjeeling tea had become the worldwide source of high-quality tea. 

Post-colonisation

Indian independence and the casting out of the British imperial power meant that the British lost control over the tea gardens they had created a century earlier.

In 1947, ownership passed hands from the British landlords to Indian entrepreneurs. For a time, things were relatively stable, benefiting the Indian economy rather than a foreign government. However, by the 1960s, communist regimes took over the area and ruled solidly until the end of the Cold War.

During this time, many political upheavals and changes occurred that weakened the industry, but finally, in the late 1980s, the situation settled. And then with the end of the Cold War, Communist-run Western Bengal lost one of the most important consumers of Darjeeling Tea, the USSR. 

Darjeeling Tea - Today

After years of political struggle and troubled times for Darjeeling tea, one would think that stability and comfort were finally here to stay, and it is true that the struggle was almost over. The last component to change was dealing with the counterfeit industry around Darjeeling tea.

Darjeeling sold its product in the same way that Champagne sells sparkling wine. It is not so much the product that deserves the name, more the place. However, for a long time, there was no protection of this brand, so entrepreneurs could sell blends of tea that were not grown in the region as Darjeeling tea, saying that it was the type of plant that made Darjeeling, rather than its origin.

Finally, in 2005, the WTO granted the Tea Board of India its protection of Darjeeling tea, stating that only tea grown in the lovely Darjeeling region could be called, labelled and sold as Darjeeling Tea.

Since then, Darjeeling Tea has enjoyed the fame that such a high-quality product deserves. With such an exquisite and delicate flavour, as well as a slew of health benefits, Darjeeling Tea is our favourite product.




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Tea Campaign Australia - Organic Darjeeling Tea - Buy in Bulk and Save

Save up to 20% when you buy your Organic Darjeeling Tea in bulk!

- Save approx. 20% when you buy 1000g instead of 4 x 250g

- Save approx. 10% when you buy 500g instead of 2 x 250g

Check out the following table to find out how long your pack of Organic Darjeeling Tea will approx. last:

 Daily Usage Daily Usage - Loose Leaf Tea Package Size Usage Duration
1 cup/day (250ml Tea) 2g Loose Leaf Tea 500g  8 Months
2 cups/day (500ml Tea) 4Loose Leaf Tea

500g

1000g

4 Months

8 Months

3 cups/day (750ml Tea) 6Loose Leaf Tea

500g

1000g

3 Months

7 Months

1 large pot/day (1-litre Tea) 8Loose Leaf Tea

500g

1000g

2 Months

4 Months

Enjoy a great cup of ORGANIC DARJEELING TEA every day!